Tel Aviv Museum of Art Showing Italian Paintings

. January 30, 2010

The Tel Aviv Museum of Art holds numerous works by important Italian artists several of which are presently on show. Gino Severini is represented by one of his famous Futurist paintings from c. 1915, the portrait of Mrs. Meyer-See, a socialite and the wife of a well-known London art dealer, as well as by Dancers at Monico’s (c. 1910), reflecting the influence of Neo-Impressionism, and Still Life with Mandolin (1918), a characteristic example of his variant of Cubism.

Giorgio de Chirico is currently represented by two works from 1955 Antique Horses, and The Philosopher and the Poet, related to this artist’s friendship with the poet Guillaume Apollinaire; among the works by Massimo Campigli Young Girl (1930), is especially notable, as is the Amedeo Modigliani portrait of actor Gaston Modot (1918); Giorgio Morandi’s characteristic Still Life (1951) is a good example from his large series of similar compositions.

Contemporary art is represented by Alighiero Boetti’s embroidery piece in which words and text are combined in a methodical manner; by the Transavanguardia artists Mimmo Paladino with a huge relief-sculpture, Sandro Chia with an environmental sculpture situated at the entrance to the Museum, and Enzo Cucchi with a monumental painting, and a mosaic created especially for the Museum’s sculpture garden, among other works. In Claudio Parmiggiani’s Untitled (2002), dust and soot are used to make the absence of books a presence.

The Collection of Modern and Contemporary Art was founded in the beginning of the 1930s, prior to the official opening of the Museum in 1932. From the outset, the Collection grew rapidly thanks to the addition of entire collections and individual works donated by collectors from around the world.

The Collection focuses on the major trends of Modernism, from Impressionism and Post-Impressionism, though the main avant-garde streams of the early 20th century, the School of Paris, and the New York School, up to the art of the 1960s. This part of the Collection is complemented by the collection of Contemporary Art, which is continuously growing. A number of collections and important groups of works of the Department are worthy of special mention.

The Art Library of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art is an essential research resource of thousands annually – students, scholars, art critics, authors and curators – from Israel and abroad. The library, known for its comprehensive collection of books, is often the sole resource in Israel for background information on Modern and Contemporary art and design. The Library was founded in 1938, and its initial collection of books was generated by private donors. The Library grew and developed at a quick pace thanks to a grant from the Helena Rubinstein Foundation in 1972.

www.tamuseum.com

Category: Museum News

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