The Heckscher at 90: Then and Now Anniversary Exhibition

. May 24, 2010 . 1 Comment

As part of its 90th anniversary celebration, The Heckscher Museum of Art presents The Heckscher at 90: Then and Now, featuring favorite works from the Permanent Collection and new acquisitions. From its founding in 1920, with a gift of more than a hundred works from the industrialist and real estate magnate August Heckscher, the Museum’s collections have grown to more than 2,200 objects. This exhibition opens with a selection of Old Master works, including portraiture and sculpture, and a broad range of 19th century American and European paintings that reflect the romantic sensibility of August Heckscher’s collecting aesthetic.

Highlights include a rare bronze by François Girardon, The Rape of Proserpine, 1693; the Museum’s oldest painting, Lucas Cranach the Elder’s Virgin, Child, St. John the Baptist and Angels, 1534; the dramatic Arab Horsemen, Defeat and Hate, 1863 by the German orientalist painter Adolf Schreyer, as well as works by William Holbrook Beard, Ralph Albert Blakelock, Alfred Thompson Bricher, Asher B. Durand, Jean-Desire-Gustave Courbet, Jean Léon Gérôme, George Inness, and the brothers Edward and Thomas Moran. The Museum’s most significant acquisition, George Grosz’s Eclipse of the Sun, 1926 will also be included, as will important recent acquisitions of works by Edward Curtis, Olafur Eliasson, Larry Fink, Red Grooms, Winslow Homer, Man Ray, Giovanni Battista Piranesi and Louis Comfort Tiffany.

The Heckscher Museum of Art, founded in 1920 by August Heckscher, is dedicated to furthering the appreciation and understanding of art by conserving, interpreting, refining and expanding its Permanent Collection, fostering scholarship, and presenting stimulating and inspiring exhibitions and educational programs for this and future generations. The Museum Permanent Collection contains more than 2,200 works from the early 16th century to present.

The Heckscher Museum of Art
2 Prime Avenue
Huntington, NY 11743
Public Information: 631.351.3250

www.heckscher.org

Category: Fine Art

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  1. Leila Zogby says:

    It is ironic that the Heckscher Museum opens this celebratory exhibit in a week when it eliminates the position of chief curator and proposes to face the future without expert curatorial leadership.

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