John Michael Kohler Arts Center Presents Hiding Places Memory in the Arts

. June 23, 2011 . 0 Comments

The John Michael Kohler Arts Center presents Hiding Places: Memory in the Arts, on view through December 2011.

Memory is embedded in everything around us—in our culture, beliefs, possessions, relationships—it is a central component of human nature. Memory’s reach can be lifelong or fleeting. We define ourselves through memory, yet it can deceive us when we are least prepared. We continually search for new and inventive ways to keep memory alive: creating, preserving, and sharing memories through Internet databases, oral and written accounts, and visual records. All of this is in an attempt to keep memory out of the mind’s deep hiding places—to master time, hang on to things we no longer possess, and share recollections we hold dear. Many fear losing their memory, while others long to forget.


Mark Fox (NY), Dust (detail), 2008, acrylic and ink on paper with metal pins, 120 x 180 in. Courtesy of Larissa Goldston Gallery, NY, and Rice Gallery, TX. Photo: Nash Baker © nashbaker.com

Hiding Places will draw on this complex and fascinating topic, breaking new ground in cross pollinated programming and engaging limitless audiences. The memory project will serve as a foundation for hosting intergenerational exchange, fostering new thinking about the aging process, finding new ways to apprehend and approach the Autism spectrum, examining the formation of personal and shared memories, and much more.

Because memory is a broad and inclusive topic, it is divided into four thematic components. Click on the names to view each component: From Memory, Holding Memory, Forget Memory, and Shared Memory.

The exhibition and accompanying book will delve deeply into each of the four areas. Artists involved in other programming areas—Performing Arts, Connecting Communities, and Education—will dovetail with the four components in various ways. The profusely illustrated book will include original writings by the exhibition’s curators and prominent scholars with expertise in savant syndrome, age and community, American culture, and art history.

John Michael Kohler Arts Center
608 New York Avenue
Sheboygan, WI 53081
P 920.458.6144
F 920.458.4473
www.jmkac.org

Category: Museum News

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