Getty Museum Announces Antiquity in the Twentieth Century. Modern Art and the Classical Vision Symposium

| October 28, 2011 | 0 Comments

The Getty Villa hosts a one-day symposium, on November 4, 2011, exploring the role “modern classicism” has played in the understanding of both modernism and the classical past. Confirmed participants include Jean-Louis Andral, Picasso Museum, Antibes; Elizabeth Cowling, University of Edinburgh; Jens Daehner, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Whitney Davis, University of California, Berkeley; Lisa Florman, The Ohio State University, Columbus; Christopher Green, Courtauld Institute of Art, London; Silvia Loreti, University of Manchester; Sheldon Nodelman, University of California, San Diego; and Kenneth Silver, New York University.

The symposium is presented in conjunction with the international loan exhibition Modern Antiquity: Picasso, de Chirico, Léger, and Picabia in the Presence of the Antique, on view November 2, 2011 through January 16, 2012 at the Getty Villa. The exhibition looks at how four eminent artists reinvented and transformed antiquity between 1906 and 1936. Juxtaposing ancient art with modern painting, it also draws attention to the ways in which these artists shaped our contemporary experience of antiquity.

Antiquity in the Twentieth Century: Modern Art and the Classical Vision will take place in the Getty Villa’s Auditorium. Tickets are $20.00 ($10.00 students) and pre-registration is required. For a program schedule and to register on line, go to:
http://www.getty.edu/museum/symposia/modern_antiquity_symposium.html

Registration is also available by calling (310) 440-7300.

For information on the exhibition Modern Antiquity: Picasso, de Chirico, Léger, and Picabia in the Presence of the Antique, go to:
http://www.getty.edu/art/exhibitions/modern_antiquity/index.html

Image: Adam and Eve, 1931. Francis Picabia (French, 1879-1953). Oil on canvas. © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS)

Category: Museum News

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