Wichita Art Museum announces Tides of Provincetown exhibition

. January 25, 2012 . 0 Comments

The Wichita Art Museum presents Tides of Provincetown an exhibition on view on view February 5 through April 29, 2012.


Ciro Cozzi Provincetown Draggers

A bustling economy, train travel, and a war in Europe, which prevented artists from traveling overseas, were some of the prevailing factors in Provincetown, Massachusetts becoming a haven for artistic creativity and productivity. Hailed as the “Biggest Art Colony in the World” by the Boston Globe in 1916, the relatively small Cape Cod town has hosted some of the biggest names in art since the late 19th and early 20th centuries and has played a pivotal role in the development of nearly every major American art movement in the last 100 years. This exclusive exhibition gives the viewer the unique opportunity to travel visually from American Impressionism to Abstract Expressionism, observing the influence Provincetown artists had on their peers as well as on the art world at large.

“We are honored to bring this exhibition to Wichita,” Says Stephen Gleissner, the Museum’s chief curator. “The breadth of this collection is staggering, and seeing all of these amazing, significant works of art in one place at one time is truly awe-inspiring.”

The Tides of Provincetown will highlight over 100 well-known artists who called the art colony home at one point during their careers and who drew inspiration and support from its growing community. Among the artists reprsented in the exhibition are Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, and Edward Hopper.

This exhibition was organized by the New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, Connecticut.

The Wichita Art Museum opened in 1935. It is home to The Roland P. Murdock Collection, one of the premier collections of American Art in the country. The Museum is proud to be supported through public and private funds, owned by the City of Wichita and managed by a private entity, Wichita Art Museum, Inc. Located at 1400 West Museum Boulevard, the Museum and Museum store are open Sunday noon – 5 p.m., and Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free through September 30 and scheduled school groups are always free. – wichitaartmuseum.org

Category: Fine Art

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