Honolulu Museum of Art presents Lethal Beauty: Samurai Weapons and Armor

The Honolulu Museum of Art presents Lethal Beauty: Samurai Weapons and Armor an exhibition on view June 06, 2013 – August 18, 2013.

Unknown artist of the Kano school, Screens with Scenes from the Tales of Heike, c. 1650-1700. Ink, gold, colors on paper. Courtesy of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture. Photography by Keiko Tanaka and Monika Jastrȩbiec Czepielewska.

Unknown artist of the Kano school, Screens with Scenes from the Tales of Heike, c. 1650-1700. Ink, gold, colors on paper. Courtesy of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture. Photography by Keiko Tanaka and Monika Jastrȩbiec Czepielewska.


Comprising approximately 63 works by more than 30 master craftsmen from the 13th to 20th centuries, Lethal Beauty features full suits of armor, helmets, warrior hats, face masks, long and short swords, daggers, rifles, and more.

The warrior culture of samurai (literally “those who serve”) is one of the most fascinating aspects of traditional Japan. Through sources such as James Clavell’s 1975 novel Shōgun and the television series it inspired, and movies like the 1977 Star Wars, samurai were introduced to millions outside Japan, rapidly gaining a place of prominence in American popular culture. The spiritual beliefs, social practices and artistic aesthetics surrounding samurai have attained a universal status that is immediately familiar. Samurai have inspired everything from business strategies to video games.

Lethal Beauty was curated by Dr. Andreas Marks, Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, and tour organized by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC. www.honolulumuseum.org

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