Experts to Tell a New Story about Early Airmail

. January 8, 2015

Jan. 24 lecture by Museum of Flight Curator and Boeing Company historian will reveal the myths about airmail service in the 1920s and 1930s

SEATTLE – Museum Curator Dan Hagedorn and The Boeing Company Historian, Mike Lombardi, combine efforts to help unravel the myths of early airmail delivery in the United States.

In 1919, Bill Boeing (r) and Eddie Hubbard complete the first international airmail flight to the United States (Vancouver, B.C. - Seattle, Wash.). The Museum of Flight Collection.

In 1919, Bill Boeing (r) and Eddie Hubbard complete the first international airmail flight to the United States (Vancouver, B.C. – Seattle, Wash.). The Museum of Flight Collection.

For a time in the 1920s and early 1930s, airmail service quickly helped build commercial air service and bring attention to the Army Air Corps at a time when it was plagued by Depression-era politics. The true story of these dramatic events in aviation have long been colored by the inaccurate accounts of the day. The result of years of research by Hagedorn and Lombardi, this insightful program aims to shed new light on the history and influence of airmail’s pivotal period.

This lecture is part of the Museum’s 50th Anniversary Origins of Aerospace Lecture Series.

The Museum of Flight is located at 9404 E. Marginal Way S., Seattle, Exit 158 off Interstate 5 on Boeing Field halfway between downtown Seattle and Sea-Tac Airport. The Museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $20 for adults, $17 for seniors 65 and older, $17 for active military, $12 for youth 5 to 17, and free for children under 5. Group rates are available. Admission on the first Thursday of the month is free from 5 to 9 p.m. courtesy of Wells Fargo. McCormick & Schmick’s Wings Café is on site. For general Museum information, please call 206-764-5720 or visit www.museumofflight.org

Category: Museum News

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