Food in the Air and Space on Menu for Weekend Events at the Museum of Flight

. June 9, 2016

Live music, aviation and a food writer’s look at inflight meals from airliners to spaceships served during 1960s Centennial Celebration Weekend

SEATTLE – The Museum’s 1960s Centennial Celebration weekend highlights include author and food historian Richard Foss presentations about food in air and space, the Pacific Northwest Distinguished Flying Cross Society’s look at Huey helicopters and their Vietnam era pilots, performances about “Laika the space dog,” and live music by the Rat City Brass, Seattle’s premier 1960s “Tijuana Brass” style 6-piece band. All free with admission to the Museum.

Food in the Air and Space on MenuSaturday, June 11
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Distinguished Flying Cross Society and Vietnam Aircraft
10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. – Rat City Brass music
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. – Weekend Family Workshops
2 to 3:30 p.m. – Author and food historian Richard Foss presents Great and Awful Moments in the History of Aerial Dining. For all the complaints about airline food, you can’t fault the creativity and sense of invention of the cooks and engineers who collaborated to take food where it had never gone before. This humorous talk shows some of the best and worst ideas in the history of inflight dining. The author will sign his book “Food In the Air and Space: The Surprising History of Food and Drink in the Skies” following his presentation.

Sunday, June 12
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. – Distinguished Flying Cross Society and Vietnam Aircraft
10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. – Laika: Space Dog. Living history performances about the famous canine space traveler.
11 a.m. to 2 p.m. – Weekend Family Workshops
2 to 3:30 p.m. – Author and food historian Richard Foss presents From Tubes and Cubes to Space Espresso – Dining in Zero Gravity. Food in space is more than sustenance–astronauts crave the flavors and textures of the planet they left behind. The tubes of mush that were standard in both the US and Soviet space programs didn’t offer this, but as the environment of space was better understood, food that was representative of their cultures and natural in form became possible. Italian astronauts brought pasta to space, the French brought haute cuisine, and the Chinese invented a unique variation on regional dishes so taikonauts could feel at home. This lecture is about the human longing for familiar foods and how it was achieved. The author will sign his book “Food In the Air and Space: The Surprising History of Food and Drink in the Skies” following his presentation.

For Museum information, please call 206-764-5720 or visit www.museumofflight.org

Category: Museum News

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