New name boards carved for Edna E. Lockwood at The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum

| July 12, 2016

The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum’s queen of the floating fleet, Edna E. Lockwood, recently received replacement name boards which were handcrafted by Winslow Womack of St. Michaels, Md. The painted name boards are relief carved out of New England white pine.

CBMM Assistant Curator of Watercraft Richard Scofield, left, stands with CBMM volunteer and carver Winslow Womack, right, who recently used a relief carving technique to craft these new name boards for the 1889 log-bottom Edna E. Lockwood, currently under restoration at CBMM through 2018.

CBMM Assistant Curator of Watercraft Richard Scofield, left, stands with CBMM volunteer and carver Winslow Womack, right, who recently used a relief carving technique to craft these new name boards for the 1889 log-bottom Edna E. Lockwood, currently under restoration at CBMM through 2018.

Womack is a longstanding volunteer at CBMM, and has carved numerous name boards for many of the boats in CBMM’s floating fleet.

Edna Lockwood’s log bottom is under a two-year restoration, with all work done in full public view. The logs for the project were recently sourced and delivered to CBMM, with the historic bugeye now hauled out due to interior cracks in her logs. The name boards will be mounted on Edna’s bowsprit when the restoration is complete.

Built in 1889 by John B. Harrison on Tilghman Island for Daniel W. Haddaway, Edna E. Lockwood dredged for oysters through winter, and carried freight—such as lumber, grain, and produce—after the dredging season ended. She worked faithfully for many owners, mainly out of Cambridge, Md., until she stopped “drudging” in 1967. In 1973, Edna was donated to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum by John R. Kimberly. Recognized as the last working oyster boat of her kind, Edna E. Lockwood was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1994. More about the project is at www.ednalockwood.org.

Established in 1965, the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum is a world-class maritime museum dedicated to preserving and exploring the history, environment, and people of the entire Chesapeake Bay, with the values of relevancy, authenticity, and stewardship guiding its mission. Serving nearly 70,000 guests each year, CBMM’s campus includes a floating fleet of historic boats and 12 exhibition buildings, situated in a park-like setting along the Miles River and St. Michaels’ harbor. For more information, visit www.cbmm.org

Category: Museum News

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