National Underground Railroad Freedom Center Announces MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU Programming

. August 31, 2018

CINCINNATI, OH – The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center has announced featured programming to complement the latest exhibit MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU opening this Saturday, September 1. The upcoming exhibit, MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU commemorates the life and legacy of former South African President Nelson Mandela through photographs by South African documentary photographer Matthew Willman as he revisited many of the locations that played an important role in South Africa’s route to racial equality and Mandela’s personal fight for freedom. The following programs will be offered to guests throughout the duration of the exhibit from September 1, 2018 through January 1, 2019:

MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU Curator Talk
Saturday, September 1 at 12:00 p.m. and Monday, September 3 at 1:00 p.m.
Join us as Matthew Willman leads a special curator talk and guided tour through MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU. Willman was commissioned by The Nelson Mandela Foundation during the last ten years of Mandela’s life. This program is included in general & special exhibition admission. Exhibit and program admission is $10 plus general admission for non-members, $5 plus general admission for members.

Mandela Fridays: Exhibition Tour
Fridays, September 14-December 14 at 1:00 p.m.
Join National Underground Railroad Freedom Center staff and docents for a guided tour of MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU for Mandela 100, a year of commemoration engagement lead by The Nelson Mandela Foundation, challenging and inspiring organizations and individuals around the world to, “be the legacy.” Included in general & special exhibition admission.

Dramatic Readings: Nelson Mandela’s Favorite African Folktales
September 20, October 18, November 15, December 20 at 2:00 p.m.
Nelson Mandela’s Favorite African Folktales; culled from African countries as far-flung as Morocco, Nigeria, Uganda, and Kenya; present a fountain of precious knowledge that will be treasured by children, as well as adults. What is particularly exciting about these dramatic readings are that some of the stories, in their oral form, are almost as old as Africa itself. Most of them were, in fact, first told in various African tongues around evening fires in centuries past. This program is free with general admission.

A Story to Be Told: The Sharpeville Massacre
September 11, October 9, November 13, December 11 at 2:00 p.m.
Sharpeville, a black suburb outside of Johannesburg, was untouched by anti-apartheid demonstrations that happen in other towns. In March 1960, things changed when Robert Sobukwe, one of the leaders in the anti-apartheid Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC) organized the town’s first protest. This program is free with general admission.

Colonialism and Imperialism: Ubuntu and the Struggle against White Supremacy in South Africa
Dates: September 8, October 13, November 10, December 8 at 3:30 p.m.
Description: In the 17th century, South Africa was colonized by the Dutch Empire and, later by the British. The history of European involvement in the region mirrors that of the Americas. As with the Caribbean and mainland North and South America, European settlers in Africa were interested in exploiting both the continent’s people, and natural resources. Join us for a discussion about white supremacy and the philosophy of Ubuntu. This program is free with general admission.

Ubuntu Conversations: We affirm our humanity when we affirm the humanity in others!
September 15, October 20, November 17, December 15 at 1:00 p.m.
Join us for a meaningful conversation as we explore the principles of Ubuntu and how they are connected with the Underground Railroad era and current-day. This program is free with general admission.

The Ubuntu Film Series
September 14, October 12, November 9, December 14 at 2:00 p.m.
Mandela the fighter. Mandela the activist. Mandela the politician, the idealist, and the symbol of a new South Africa, the symbol of peace. This film series seeks to illuminate the fight for civil and human rights as the life and history of Mandela embodies. This program is free with general admission.

“These programs not only complement MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU but it gives a complete, factual narrative of Mandela and his life”, says Jacqueline Dace, Deputy Director of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center. “His story continues to inspire and remind us that one man can make a difference in the ongoing fight for freedom.”

MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU opens to the public, Saturday, September 1. MANDELA: THE JOURNEY TO UBUNTU is sponsored by Thomas R. Schiff, P&G John & Francie Pepper Macy’s and The John A. Scroth Family Charitable Trust, PNC Bank, Trustee. For more information about exhibits and programming at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, visit freedomcenter.org

Category: Museum News

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