Museum of Flight Host’s World’s First Army Enlistment Ceremony from Space

. February 22, 2020

SEATTLE – It’s not quite the Space Force, but it will be the first-ever U.S. military oath of enlistment ceremony from space. On Feb. 26 at 9:50 a.m., the Museum, NASA and U.S. Army Recruiting will host a live video link with the International Space Station, where U.S. Army Col./NASA astronaut Dr. Andrew Morgan will deliver the oath of enlistment to new recruits during a ceremony at the Museum. More than 850 future soldiers will participate at more than 130 locations across the country.

After the ceremony, Morgan will conduct a question-and-answer session broadcast to the new enlistees at the Museum and participating locations. Nearly 30 recruits at the Museum will interact with Morgan via a video wall next to the Space Shuttle Trainer in the Charles Simonyi Space Gallery.

Media are invited to attend the oath of enlistment. Doors open to guests and media at 9:00 a.m., and to the public at 10 a.m. For more information from Seattle U.S. Army Recruiting Battalion, please contact Christopher Stanis at christopher.s.stanis.civ@mail.mil, or Ted Huetter at The Museum of Flight.

About Astronaut Dr. Andrew Morgan
Dr. Andrew “Drew” Morgan was selected by NASA in 2013. He is an emergency physician in the U.S. Army with sub-specialty certification in primary care sports medicine. Morgan completed residency in Emergency Medicine, Madigan-University of Washington Emergency Medicine Residency, Tacoma, Wash. in 2005. Prior to his selection to NASA’s 21st group of astronauts, Morgan served in elite special operations units worldwide. He is currently serving aboard the International Space Station as a flight engineer for Expedition 60, 61 and 62.

For general Museum information, please call 206-764-5720 or visit www.museumofflight.org

NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan takes pictures with a camera shielded from the effects of microgravity during a spacewalk to finalize thermal repairs on the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a dark matter and antimatter detector. (Jan. 25, 2020) NASA photo.

Category: Science Technology

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