Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Opens Galleries Featuring 18th-Century Period Rooms and Decorative Arts from Great Britain

Two 18th-century period rooms from Great Britain have been reinstalled at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), as part of a suite of galleries.

The Hamilton Palace Room, May 8, 2013. Alan and Simone Hartman Galleries, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Photo: © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

The Hamilton Palace Room, May 8, 2013. Alan and Simone Hartman Galleries, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Photo: © Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


The Alan and Simone Hartman Galleries comprise the Newland House Drawing Room, Hamilton Palace Dining Room, and British Art 1560–1830. They showcase nearly every facet of British art—paintings, furniture, silver, ceramics, and works on paper—including the Alan and Simone Hartman Collection of English silver, with superb examples made in London by Huguenot craftsmen between 1680 and 1760. The drawing room from Newland House, a manor house in Gloucestershire, England, was acquired by the MFA in 1931 and was last on view at the Museum in the 1970s. The dining room from Hamilton Palace, the vast residence of the Dukes of Hamilton just outside of Glasgow, Scotland, was acquired by the MFA in 1924. It was installed in 1928, but was dismantled during the past decade due to the construction of the adjacent Art of the Americas Wing, which debuted in November 2010. The three adjacent Hartman Galleries are located on Level 2 of the Museum’s Art of Europe wing. Concurrent to their opening, the MFA has unveiled its new Art of the Netherlands in the 17th Century Gallery (the renovation of this gallery was made possible by Rose-Marie and Eijk van Otterloo) and the renovated Leo and Phyllis Beranek Gallery, which together showcase more than 100 works. www.mfa.org

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