Museum of Flight Awards $238,000 in Scholarships to 16 High School Students

SEATTLE – The Museum of Flight awarded $238,000 in scholarships to 15 Washington students and one Oregon high school student for post-secondary education and flight training during a hybrid ceremony held on May 17, 2022. The scholarships are awarded each year to students who have participated in The Museum of Flight’s education programs or are enrolled in Raisbeck Aviation High School. The recipients represent a racial and economic diversity of 112 applicants chosen from 44 school districts. The ceremony was emceed by the Museum’s Vice President of Education, Dr. Dana Riley Black. The keynote speaker was former astronaut, Dr. Bonnie Dunbar.

“The Museum’s education programs are designed to guide students’ inspiration, exploration and preparation of space and aviation topics. These annual scholarships create a unique bridge from the Museum’s programs to the students’ next steps in their education and careers,” said Dr. Black. “The post-secondary STEM education scholarships are opportunities for high school seniors planning to attend a college, university or trade school in science, technology, engineering or mathematics-related field with plans of pursuing a career in aviation or aerospace, and the flight training scholarships provide opportunities for high school students who want to earn their private pilot license—which is an important first milestone for anyone with aspirations to become a professional pilot or aviation industry professional. We are so proud to see that past recipients have since become commercial pilots and aerospace professionals.”

The 16 scholarship recipients represent eight school districts, and they reported their gender as 50 percent male and 50 percent female. Forty-four percent reported eligibility for Free/Reduced lunch. (Detailed data is available upon request.)

THE AWARDS

One Frank “Sam” and Betty Houston Post-secondary Scholarship at up to $120,000 towards a degree related to the field of aviation or aerospace

Five Frank “Sam” and Betty Houston Flight Training Scholarships at $12,000 each.

One Alaska Airlines Flight Training Scholarship at up to $12,000 toward earning a Private Pilot License.

Two Benjamin L. Ellison Future Pilot Scholarships at up to $12,000 toward earning a Private Pilot License.

One Aeronautical Science Pathway Scholarship Recipient at up to $3,000 toward flight training or post-secondary education.

Two Stephen and Hazel Eastman Memorial Post-secondary Scholarships at $2,000 each toward post-secondary education.

Two Stuart Knopp Memorial Scholarship Recipients at $2,500 each toward post-secondary education.

Two Jim and Sue Johnson Post-Secondary STEM Education Scholarship Recipients at

$5,000 each toward STEM-based scholarship pursuits with opportunity for renewal.

THE RECIPIENTS

2022 Frank “Sam” and Betty Houston Post-Secondary STEM Education Scholarship Recipient | Up to $120,000 towards a degree related to the field of aviation or aerospace:

Sophia Lin is a senior at Newport High School in the Bellevue School District. She has participated in a multitude of Museum programs including Aeronautical Explorations, Boeing Academy for STEM Learning at Home, Private Pilot Ground School and Washington Aerospace Scholars. Through her work in Private Pilot Ground School she was able to pass the FAA private pilot exam.

“As a first-generation student with a hearing disability and aspiring aerospace engineer, I hope to expand my horizons and venture my aerospace and STEM outreach dreams to take flight in college and industry.”

2022 Frank “Sam” and Betty Houston Flight Training Scholarship Recipients | Up to $12,000 each toward earning a Private Pilot license:

Colton Bryant is a senior at Raisbeck Aviation High School in the Highline School District. He has participated in his school’s Aviation Career Experience Club for the past four years where he received the CLASS (character, leadership, attitude, service and scholarship) Award for his commitment to the club. Colton hopes to be a commercial pilot and specifically wants to fly wide body aircraft.

“I have always loved the sensation flying gave me, the adrenaline rush as the plane took off, seeing the farms down below like little green circles and squares, the mountains rising up, dotted with hidden lakes, and the wide ocean. Along with that, I appreciate that it demands concentration, knowing your checklists and procedures by heart, and always evaluating things step by step.”

Carson Turner is a senior at Tahoma High School in the Tahoma School District. Carson is currently enrolled in the Museum’s Aeronautical Science Pathway program, and has previously participated in the Museum’s Aeronautical Explorations program. He will be attending the University of North Dakota and is planning to double major in Commercial Aviation and Atmospheric Sciences with the career goal of being a commercial airline pilot.

“When I was eight, I was lucky enough to see the Blue Angels fly at Seafair. When I first saw them fly over me I was awestruck by how close together they were, how fast they were going and how they knew every move each person was going to make. I was amazed that someone could control something with so much power so precisely. Little did I know that this experience would spark a passion that has stuck with me for my entire life and has led me to pursue a career as a commercial airline pilot.”

Melissa Graham is a senior at the International School in the Bellevue School District. She participated in the Museum’s Aeronautical Explorations program. Melissa’s career goal is to become a professional pilot with the opportunity to explore positions in training or safety-related systems.

“Looking forward, my goal is to not only become a professional airline pilot but also to find my fit and a way that I can give back to the aviation community. Initially, I know what that looks like. I believe that I can become an excellent Certified Flight Instructor. I look forward to sharing my knowledge and love of aviation with other aspiring students. Once I reach the airlines, I intend to look for opportunities in a training department as an instructor or possibly in the airline’s safety department.”

Emily Batig is a junior at Raisbeck Aviation High School in the Highline School District. She is currently enrolled in the Museum’s Aeronautical Science Pathway program. Her career goal is to be a United States Military or commercial pilot.

“Learning to fly has also been a goal of mine because I have a desire to help others whenever possible. I believe that flying suits this goal because as a commercial or military pilot, you are able to provide necessary resources and/or transportation to others. In addition, flying will allow me to communicate with others and potentially allow me to directly help others potentially interested in entering the aviation field.”

Cole Cummins is a senior at Issaquah High School in the Issaquah School District. He is currently enrolled in the Museum’s Aeronautical Science Pathway program. His long-term career goal is to become a commercial airline pilot for a major carrier and is currently planning to major in professional flight, maintenance or airport management.

“I want to fly because of the ability to get in the sky, get a bird’s eye view of the world, and not be trapped with the confines of the ground.”

2022 Alaska Airlines Flight Training Scholarship at up to $12,000 toward earning a Private Pilot license:

Kyle Swiderski is a senior at Kentwood High School in the Kent School District. He has previously participated in the Museum’s Private Pilot Ground School program. Kyle’s career goal is to be a commercial airline pilot.

“Private Pilot Ground School has left a large impact on me. Being able to be around so many people in the aviation industry has pushed to motivate me even more into wanting to be a pilot. There were so many people who were going for the same goal, and I am glad to have met everyone I did.”

2022 Benjamin L. Ellison Future Pilot Scholarship Recipients | Up to $12,000 each toward earning a Private Pilot license:

Luke Folsom is a senior at Franklin High School in the Seattle School District. He is currently enrolled in the Museum’s Aeronautical Science Pathway program. His career goal is to be a professional pilot for major U.S. airline.

“I was recently challenged by my parents to come up with a word to describe what I value – what it is that guides my decision making in my life. The word I chose is certainty. To me, to feel certain about something means that I am able to see a clear path forward, I recognize both the risks and rewards, and when making a decision I then move forward in confidence. ASP has given me the most clarity and certainty I have ever experienced in my life.”

Andrew Ta is a junior at Tyee High School in the Highline School District. He is currently enrolled in the Museum’s Aeronautical Science Pathway program, and has previously participated in the Museum’s Private Pilot Ground School. Andrew plans to get a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering and then become an airline pilot by the age of 25.

“Servant leadership and teamwork are core values of mine and I love to help others however I can. Whether that is flying search and rescue missions for the Civil Air Patrol or just simply getting my passengers from point A to point B, I want to use my flying to create a positive impact on my community.”

2022 Jim and Sue Johnson Post-Secondary STEM Education Scholarship Recipients | $5,000 each toward STEM-based scholarship pursuits with opportunity for renewal:

Stephen Chen is a senior at Liberty High School in the Issaquah School District. He is currently enrolled in the Museum’s Aeronautical Science Pathway program and has previously participated in Aeronautical Explorations. Stephen was accepted to the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Daytona Beach Air Traffic Management Program and plans to major in Air Traffic Control as well as minor in Aviation Business Administration and Unmanned Aircraft Systems Science.

“My vision is to help shape the future aviation paths of our global travels. I hope to revolutionize and manage air safety and air routes of future aircrafts and/or rockets, through collaboration with commercial space tourism spaceports who will be sharing the same airspace.”

Lyra Young is a senior at Raisbeck Aviation High School in the Highline School District. She is active in her school’s Airline Career Experience Club where she has previously served as secretary, vice president and is now currently serving as president. Lyra’s career goal is to become an aerospace engineer to help create better energy-efficient aircraft.

“As an aerospace engineer, my job will be to design aircraft that will be part of a future design revolution; these aircraft will meet high environmental standards as well as meet the demands of the aviation industry, allowing them to completely overcome today’s limitations. I want to keep flying well into my adulthood and old age, and this is the way I am able to do that. By redefining the aviation industry, I will ensure that future generations will be able to experience what I have come to love: flight.”

2022 Aeronautical Science Pathway Scholarship Recipient | $3,000 toward flight training or post-secondary education:

Cilicia Diaz is a junior at Tahoma High School in the Tahoma School District. She is currently enrolled in the Museum’s Aeronautical Science Pathway program. Cilicia hopes to attend the Air Force Academy or Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University straight out of high school with the goal of becoming an airline pilot.

“No excuse will get in my way of becoming a pilot. No one thing, person, or event will get in my way of becoming the greatest version of myself in aviation possible. Your stereotypical underprivileged woman of color will not fall into these roles. I am exhausted from being a statistic in unfortunate situations. This exhaustion is motivation. Motivation to achieve the curiosity that younger me had of becoming a pilot.”

2022 Stephen and Hazel Eastman Memorial Scholarship Recipients | $2,000 toward post-secondary education:

Emma Truscott is a senior at South Eugene High School in the 4J School District in Eugene, Oregon. She has previously participated in the Museum’s Washington Aerospace Scholars program, where she was the Systems Manager for the team tasked with designing rocket componentry, propulsion and landing systems. Emma plans to have a career in astronautical engineering.

“I asked my teacher if she knew of any programs for students interested in furthering their education in Earth and Space Science. With a smile, she sent me a link to sign up for a program called Washington Aerospace Scholars, which changed my life forever. What I’ve learnt from this opportunity made me realize that a field in aerospace, specifically astronautical, is something that I want to pursue, and spend my whole life with. The future was in the stars, and I wanted to be there too.”

Carl Luidee Lim is a senior at Tyee High School in the Highline School District. He previously participated in the Museum’s Washington Aerospace Scholars (WAS) program. Carl plans to have a career in engineering. He grew up in a small city in the Philippines.

“When I entered the WAS program, I had the opportunity to learn about the area of aerospace, the new and exciting discoveries it has made, and, most significantly, the engineering prowess required to accomplish all of the feats it has done so far. My experiences with the program have given me a new appreciation for aerospace and the individuals that work tirelessly to provide us with a greater knowledge of the world beyond our own.”

2022 Stuart Knopp Memorial Scholarship Recipients | $2,500 each toward post-secondary education:

Emilia Hickle is a senior at South Kitsap High School in the South Kitsap School District. She is currently enrolled in the Museum’s Aeronautical Science Pathway program and has previously participated in the Washington Aerospace Scholars program. Emilia plans to major in aerospace engineering with the career goal to be an airline pilot.

“I regularly donate my time to the community through my involvement with Interact Club and student tutoring. I also used to run my local elementary school’s Aviation Club, where I helped future aviators materialize their passions and learn about flight. Once I become a pilot, I plan to participate in efforts to inspire girls to consider careers in aviation or other STEM fields.”

Astrid Johnson is a senior at Ingraham High School in the Seattle School District. She has previously participated in the Museum’s Washington Aerospace Scholars (WAS) program and the Museum’s Aerospace Camp Experience. Astrid has received an early decision acceptance to Smith College where she will study physics and hold a research position. Her career goal is to become a rocket scientist.

“As I go off to college to study physics with the dream of becoming a rocket scientist, I will take what I learned at The Museum of Flight and WAS and build on it to expand my knowledge and experience.”

Photos and detailed bios of each recipient are available upon request through The Museum of Flight. Data is also available detailing the applicants’ school districts, gender and eligibility for free/reduced lunch programs.

The Museum of Flight’s Boeing Academy for STEM Learning

All education programs at The Museum of Flight operate under the umbrella of
The Boeing Academy for STEM Learning, which was created in 2015 through a major investment by The Boeing Company and Mr. and Mrs. William E. Boeing, Jr. From pre-kindergarten to college prep and career readiness programs, the Academy provides unparalleled learning opportunities for students to explore and prepare for education and career pathways in flight, engineering and space.

The Academy strives to accelerate opportunities for all youth, with particular focus on under-resourced and underrepresented populations, by connecting them to fulfilling, in-demand STEM careers. The Academy operates in partnership with schools, community-based organizations, government, business and industry to ensure that the next generation of workers are ready to lead and innovate.

For Museum information, please call 206-764-5720 or visit www.museumofflight.org

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