Museum of Flight Veterans Day Celebration – Ceremony, Submariner, Film and Music

SEATTLE – The Museum celebrates Nov. 11 Veterans Day with live music, a movie and a ceremony including keynote speaker retired U.S. Navy Capt. Bill Woodman, who served from 1968-1998 and commanded the submarines USS James Monroe and USS Alabama. Museum admission will be free for all veterans and active-duty military (Free admission can only be redeemed on-site; not applicable to online sales. Active Duty must present valid I.D.).

The events begin at 11 a.m. with a performance by the Boeing Band, followed at 12 p.m. with a ceremony including keynote speaker Woodman and Tukwila Mayor Allan Ekberg. At 2 p.m. there will be a screening of Into Flight Once More, the Gary Sinise-narrated documentary about World War II veterans brought together on a journey to France for the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion.

Keynote Speaker Bill Woodman
Retired Capt. Bill Woodman served in the U.S. Navy from 1968-1998, reaching the rank of Captain. He served on five submarines and eventually commanded two submarines, the USS James Monroe SSBN 627 Blue and the USS Alabama SSBN 731 Blue. Following service on submarines he was the Chief of Staff for U.S. Naval Forces Japan, and concluded his career as the Professor of Naval Science at Renesslaer Polythecnic Institute.

While in the service he was recognized with three awards of the Legion of Merit, three awards of the Meritorious Service Medal, and various other commendations and service awards.

From 1998-2004, Woodman was a Research Coordinator in the University of Washington Applied Physics Lab.

Starting in 2002 Woodman taught physics, geometry and Fundamentals of Engineering at the Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences. He retired from teaching in June 2015. Woodman is a Docent at the Museum of Flight and has served in that capacity for over 2,000 hours of volunteer hours.

For general Museum information, please call 206-764-5720 or visit www.museumofflight.org

Image: U.S. Navy Capt. Bill Woodman circa 1990s. Courtesy Bill Woodman.

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