National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) Presents Pressing Ideas: Fifty Years of Women’s Lithographs from Tamarind

The National Museum of Women in the Arts presents Pressing Ideas: Fifty Years of Women’s Lithographs from Tamarind an exhibition on view through October 2, 2011.

Pressing Idea: Fifty Years of Women’s Lithographs from Tamarind brings together a conversation among women artists who helped to uncover an artistic medium that had essentially lain dormant for decades and to revive the concept of working collaboratively. Featuring 75 works by 42 artists including June Wayne, Elaine de Kooning, Louise Nevelson, Margo Humphrey, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith, and Kiki Smith, Pressing Ideas explores the breadth of experimentation in lithography and women’s contributions to a workshop that stretches the creative boundaries.

Founded by artist June Wayne in 1960 as Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles, Tamarind Institute (now in Albuquerque, New Mexico) changed the canon of printmaking in 20th century America and continues to set the standard for fine art lithography–an extremely complex and nuanced printmaking process. The organization’s mission to preserve fine art lithography and encourage artists from all media to explore its expressive potential inspired a renaissance in the dying art. The institute emphasizes intimate collaborative partnerships between artist and printer and has produced prints with a range of emerging and established artists.

Committed to education, Tamarind runs intensive professional training programs, organizes exhibitions and projects around the world, and publishes comprehensive materials on technique.

This summer, NMWA presents Pressing Ideas: Fifty Years of Women’s Lithographs from Tamarind, featuring more than 70 prints made during the past five decades by artists including Polly Apfelbaum, Louise Nevelson, and Kiki Smith that demonstrate a wide spectrum of aesthetic and technical investigation and conceptual goals.

The University of New Mexico Art Museum houses and maintains the Tamarind Archive, a collection which contains multiple impressions from nearly every print pulled in Tamarind’s fifty year history.

Image: Kiki Smith, Afternoon, 2010 Five color lithograph with glitter 16 x 20 in. Collaborating printer Bill Lagattuta On loan from Tamarind Institute

www.nmwa.org

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